Johnny Childs On My Blog

Stan Erhart stan@ERHART.NET
Wed Sep 26 16:27:19 EDT 2012


I don't think it's even a zero sum game locally. If someone else gets a
gig, they aren't necessarily getting my gig. Clubs have lots of choices in
who's available, who'll draw a crowd, who'll entertain their built-in
audience (if they have one), who they like personally, etc. Yes, if there
were absolutely no competition, maybe a person could get every gig in
town. But in a town like that, would there even be a live music scene?

There are actually a lot of gigs available, but we all want the best gigs.
If someone doesn't have to play the Fillmore or Yoshi's in order to
motivate themselves out of the house, there are lots of other places to
play. And as one musician friend says, "Every gig's one step closer to the
Fillmore." Well, maybe that's not entirely true, but the idea is to be out
there doing it - somewhere. That often means conforming to the needs of
the venue, which can be tough. When it comes right down to it, a lot of
musicians don't want to play unless everything is just right - and I don't
mean just the money. They want to play the material they want, at the
volume they want, and with the respect they feel they deserve. Working
musicians throughout history haven't always been front and center. At some
venues it's about the food and conversation and ambience. At other places
you have to take charge of the crowd. Or it can be one way during the
dinner hour, and another way later in the evening.

This is off the subject in some ways, but in other ways, it's not. TC
carved out his nitch in the music scene, but it's not the only way to
slice the pie. Everyone has to find their own way and place. I personally
think "real musicians" need to stay focused on their music, and what
they'll be happy doing. One of my friends consciously decided to get out
of music in his thirties because he said he wouldn't be satisfied unless
he made it big. If someone knows that about themselves, then yea, they
should quit, or lighten the struggle and just play occasionally with
friends. Only a few make good money at music, and even for them, it's a
struggle. BB King and Buddy Guy haven't always made the bucks. Even now,
they both play gigs that aren't huge gigs in my opinion. But they keep
their schedules full. And they're on the road A LOT, which isn't an easy
lifestyle.
------------------------------------------------------------
From: Steve Ahola <steveahola@CA.ASTOUND.NET>
To: BLUES-L@LISTSERV.NETHELPS.COM
Date: 9/26/2012 11:38:06 AM
Subject: Re: Johnny Childs On My Blog

I agree with you that success is not a zero sum game- its not like one
artist will succeed at the expense of others (one exception is the local
blues scene where there are a limited number of gigs.) Not to split
hairs but I always considered Johnny Childs to be a rock guitarist
playing blues which IMO is not exactly non mainstream.

Steve Ahola

On 9/9/2012 8:24 AM, Sonlewis1@AOL.COM wrote:
> Although Johnny Childs lives in my area, I don't know him personally but
> some common friends tell me he is a really good guy who is working hard
at
> his  craft while working doubly hard to promote himself and build on his
> career...  that being said, I learned a very long time ago (because I am
an
old
> guy) that  you can't look at other successful musicians with either
> admiration or  contempt.  In this industry (and it IS a business if you
choose to
> look at  it for career aspirations) there are a great many reasons for
success
> (or the  lack of it).
>
> They once asked a famous baseball manager (Leo Durocher, I think) why
the
> NY Giants (they used to be in NY) beat is superior Brooklyn Dodgers to
the
> playoffs... His response was "I have been good and I have been lucky...
I
> prefer  being lucky".
>
> Successful promotion of a non-mainstream music (and the stream gets
> shallower and narrower each year) is difficult and even the most
talented
folks
> can find it a frustrating and unrewarding process.
>
>
> Son  Lewis
> Blues Vocalist/Guitarist
> _www.sonlewis.com
>
>
> In a message dated 9/9/2012 10:40:14 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> mannish@WINDSTREAM.NET writes:
>
> That  frustration and futility hasruined a lot of people. I am sure most
> musicians  and artists have seen others attain success and thought I can
do
> that, or I  can dobetter......It will drive you slap-dab crazy if you
let  it
>
>
> _ (http://www.sonlewis.comIn a message dated 9/9/2012 10:40:14 A.M.
Eastern
> Daylight Time, mannish@WINDSTREAM.NET writes:That frustration and
futility
> hasruined a lot of people. I am sure most musicians and artists have
seen
> others attain success and thought I can do that, or I can
dobetter......It
>
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>
>
>

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