A heated discussion on 'Race, Gender & the Blues'

P.W. Fenton pwfenton@RADIOFREERADIO.ORG
Tue May 29 07:04:19 EDT 2012


I'm curious about the source of your conclusion "there was not a general interest of country music among the wider black audience"?  What do you base that conclusion on?  What period are you speaking about, and in what region?  Nothing I know about black culture in the south seems to support that conclusion.  Where does your knowledge of what would be "natural" for B.B. King to study, as opposed to what would be "natural" for Mississippi John Hurt?  Are you basing that on how their music "sounds" to you... or knowledge about what their families listened to when they were little boys?

You should listen to Big Jack Johnson's "I'm A Big Boy Now" from the soundtrack of Robert Mugge's "Deep Blues" documentary :-)

P.W. Fenton
Hudson, FL
2003 KBA winner
http://BluesLand.Net

On May 28, 2012, at 20:34, Harri Haka wrote:

> Like I was saying, there was not a general interest for country music
> among the wider black audience. It is of course natural for a talent
> like B.B. King to have studied all genres including country and jazz.
> But does any of this reflect on his actual playing or singing? He has
> flirted with U2, Eric Clapton and others in the past years but I hardly
> find a c&w influence on any of his recordings. Mississippi John Hurt is
> greatly respected but he was a folk singer and story teller with a
> natural connection to country music of his time.
> Harri
> 
> 
> 29.5.2012 2:35, jinxblues@aol.com kirjoitti:
>> 
>>   Not wanting to take part in the c&w discussion more than to say that
>>   there was never a general interest in country music within the black
>>   community.
>> 
>>   ------------
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>   This is absolutely not true.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>   Blues people growing up in the south in the 1930s and 1940s all listened to WLAC (Nashville) with its powerful signal.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>   B.B.King told me in great detail how he had listen to Gene Autry and Red Foley and Jimmy Rogers.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>   Mississippi John Hurt's "Let the Mermaids Flirt with me" is unmistakably Jimmy Rogers'"All Around the Water Tank" a/k/a "Waiting for a Train."
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Dick Waterman
>> 1601 Buchanan Avenue
>> Oxford, MS 38655
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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