28th IBC Results

hashbb@AOL.COM hashbb@AOL.COM
Wed Feb 8 10:03:15 EST 2012


 Yes, the originators have died. Blues has always been constantly evolving,
and that is not the point. The further you get from the root, the more watered down
the music is from that original form. That is inevitable. To keep the music alive and vital, it will and must change.
When it went from acoustic to electric, it changed. When more white players came into the
mix and added to it, it also changed. As a musician, it is hard not to have pre conceived notions
about Blues. Over 40 years that I have listened to the music and attended live shows and made the music,
my tastes have changed. How can they not? Hopefully my ears have gotten better and more educated and discerning.
 It has been a beautiful ride, and I am happy to say I have gotten to see, work, jam, and interact with many of the Blues originators.
Probably the last generation to be able to do so. I feel very fortunate in that respect. 
There are some forms of Blues I personally favor, and some I do not. That does not make
those forms less viable as music. These new forms of Blues that are very good, with the root of the music
woven into the structure and the feeling. There are also new forms of Blues that are purely a marketing 
money making gimmick, thought up because the powers that be realize that if you have X, X, and Y elements in the music,
people tend to favor it and will either buy it or attend shows. As far as keeping a real blues root/feel 
alive and making the music more modern and palatable to the current music buying/using public, I have
no answer there. I see very true points made by Chuck, Jonny, and even part of what Bonni says.
I guess bottom line music is all personal, and is the taste and choice of the listener.
HB


 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Chuck Winans <chuckone@SBCGLOBAL.NET>
To: BLUES-L <BLUES-L@LISTSERV.NETHELPS.COM>
Sent: Wed, Feb 8, 2012 7:57 am
Subject: Re: 28th IBC Results


Describe the whole group?  Not at all.  Not any more than all Germans in the 

1930s were nazis.  There is a loud, militant faction within every large group, 

often heard and never swayed from their talking points -- not even when the 

rationale of their argument no longer holds any water.  Happens in every 

profession.  



Of course there is something missing in a lot of the blues being produced today, 

in terms of authenticity as many define it.  The originators have died.





On Feb 8, 2012, at 7:03 AM, Jonny Meister <bluesandbeyond@GMAIL.COM> wrote:



> I don't think "traditionalist snob" or "blues nazi" or "folk nazi"

> are terms that fairly describe the whole group of people who feel, as

> Bonni does, that something's gone awry here. Some people are totally

> opposed to any change or closed off to any new ideas in a musical

> genre, but you don't have to be that way at all to feel,

> nevertheless, that there is something missing in a lot of the blues

> coming out now, and that some magical quality that made you love

> blues in the first place isn't there in a lot of what is now being

> promoted and talked about as blues music. I think Brandon O. Bailey

> is pretty innovative and modern, yet is also really "blues" in a true

> sense; but so many of these bands we're hearing now are really more

> blues-flavored rock, good at what they do, but it's not really solid

> blues - - a call I think one can legitimately make without

> necessarily being a "purist," "snob," or whatever.

> 

> The marketplace, the economics of it, what sells and what doesn't,

> has always been very important; it certainly was for Sam Phillips and

> is for labels and major blues organizations today too.  It is a

> struggle for them to survive. It definitely saddens me... that's why

> festivals are so important (at least some of them!). They present

> blues artists who can't get booked at clubs because they are unknown.

> The festivals thrive because they are events in and of themselves,

> that appeal just for being fun events - - though they also bring in

> some of these artists. At a blues festival you will encounter folks

> who know a lot about the music and some of the performers, but even

> more folks who know very little but just want to come out for the

> fun, and may buy some albums too.

> 

> As always, the true blues seems to survive on the periphery by the

> skin of its teeth.

> 

> 

> At 06:49 AM 2/8/2012, Chuck Winans wrote:

>> There are "traditionalist snobs" attached to every style of music...

> 

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