unusual guitars

Blue Stew res1l97q@verizon.net
Thu Jan 29 23:52:28 EST 2004


What's this now?  Jokes are allowed on this planet??!!!!!  I've been
stumbling, aimlessly through cyberspace for the past 2,000 years, I fall
into this black hole and I'm right back where I started..."NBC HELL!!!
Or is it just "NO HEADING PURGATORY"? HELLLLP MR. WIZAAAARD!
mike

-----Original Message-----
From: Blues Music List [mailto:BLUES-L@LISTS.NETSPACE.ORG] On Behalf Of
Lew & Bridget Jetton
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2004 5:12 PM
To: BLUES-L@LISTS.NETSPACE.ORG
Subject: Re: unusual guitars

Thanks y'all!  Up until now, I thought that was hurly-gurly...not Hurdy
Gurdy" Of course, a "hurly-gurly" is a young woman who's had too much to
drink..

Pat Boyack wrote:
>
> WOW! I'm surprised the new list mom Charles Nevitt didn't tell you
guys to
> use a "GEAR" header on this one.......<big ass g>
>
> Pat B
>
> On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 00:40:19 -0700, Fred Dabney <fdabney@nmsu.edu>
wrote:
>
> >> What thuh hell's a "hurdy-gurdy"??? Is that
> >> one???
> >
> >A true "hurdy-gurdy" (also known by a lot of other names such
> >as "Lyra Organizatta") is that thing famous in cartoons and such
> >that the "organ grinder" plays.
> >
> >Take a small organ in a portable case.  One of the player's  hands
> >turns a crank, the other plays the keyboard.  About an octave, octave
> >and a fourth is typical.  Monkey with a cup is optional.
> >
> >But wait!  There's More!!.  While the player is turning the crank
> >which pumps the bellows for the organ part, it also spins
> >a rosined wheel which rubs a string or strings.  The keys not
> >only work the organ pipes but also stops the string so he's
> >playing an organ and a bowed string instrument at the same
> >time.  With the same hand...
> >
> >This ungainly contraption was very popular with roving musicians
> >in Naples.  And Haydn, of all people wound up composing a lot
> >of music for one as a result of a nutty king in Naples who played
> >it.  AS if that wasn't enough, the works were actually commissioned
> >by the Russian ambassador to Naples who also taught the king how
> >to play it.  They were fond of doing duets on a pair of these things
> >for the court.  The record isn't clear on whether or not the court
> >enjoyed listening to them, although Haydn's music was actually
> >pretty good.
> >
> >King Ferdinand was a nut case.  He was fond of riding his horse into
> >the court, and sneaking around goosing the courtiers.  Talk about
> >RHIP!
> >
> >Modern bands have a long way to go before they can catch
> >up with musicians from a few centuries back...
> >
> >Fred D.
> >
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