NATIONAL CD BOYCOTT WEEK - JUNE 23 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2002

Chris Burger cburger3001@yahoo.com
Wed Jun 26 23:05:55 EDT 2002


Jim, I'd like to agree with you about blues as art (the good stuff anyway) ,but I also know that a lot of working musicians might heavily disagree with it not being a business as you say. Even an elder statesman like the late Sunnyland Slim, an artist if there ever was one in blues, surely wanted his slice of the pie, be it record sales from his trunk, or to keep the gigs coming. Thoughts, anyone?
-CB(not 91)
  JBW <jwells@iadfw.net> wrote: Blues is not business, it's art. Brittney Spears' (et al) music is not
art, it's business.

By business, I mean a commercial enterprise where the founders/investors
expect to make money (and lots of it, too) immediately and over the long
haul. Anyone who expects this from the performance and recording of blues
(as opposed to rock and other cross-ruffed motifs that are commercial at
their core) is just naive or deluded or both.

Call me cynical but...

Rgds...Jim
---------------------------------------------
jwells@iadfw.net
jbwellz@attbi.com
www.geocities.com/big_jim_wells


----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Burger"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2002 6:20 PM
Subject: Re: NATIONAL CD BOYCOTT WEEK - JUNE 23 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2002


> On Tue, 25 Jun 2002 16:46:30 -0700, Cookie Holley
> wrote:
> >http://www.anti-dmca.com/cgi-bin/enews.cgi
> >>NATIONAL CD BOYCOTT WEEK - JUNE 23 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2002
> >LET US BE HEARD
> >"After learning about the lawsuit launched on May 28th against the free
> >music file sharing service Audiogalaxy.com, it became all too clear,
> >big business owns music, or does it? If you are like me then you are
> >tired of paying $18 for a music CD that costs at the most $1 to make.
> >Record labels try to justify their anger over file sharing by saying
> >it's stealing from the hard working-artists pockets. By working for a
> >record label for a period of time I know first hand that artist only
> >receives at most 8% of sales (sold from the labels to distributors for
> >$8 a cd) that's .64 cents...."
>
>
> ***************************************************************
> I am one of those who don't mourn the attack on Napster and other file-
> sharing services, no matter the raw deal normal record contracts offer. I
> still don't see how all of it is not STEALING from the record companies
> ("the Evil Empire," I'm told ) let alone the artists.
>
> And who are these "artists" - your local budding musician who likes a
> little exposure and to sell maybe a few CD's but is hardly is headed for
> the fast track? Or are we talking about an experienced, touring bluesman
of
> some stature who used to have a few juke hits and had a few records and
CDs
> out on, say, Rounder or Black Top but is hardly doing "great"?
>
> Or, is it the bands like Oasis, Britney Spears, and Michael Jackson, the
> latter mega-star who recently joined a suit of felow artists claiming to
> be "exploited" ? (!) To say that all of these are in the same boat is a
bit
> of a stretch. (Personally, I'm most interested in the blues guy in the
> middle and if he can "stay in business.")
>
> I'm sure we'd all be depressed to learn how much the workers who made out
> sneakers were paid, but that doesn't mean you get to run off your own fake
> Nikes - or steal 'em from the store.
>
> I say to artists, get a better deal, if possible, but last I checked,no
one
> forces artists, large or small, to sign these contracts. Sure, organize,
> organize, as is the labor movement tradition, if you can, but this whole
> championing of Napster, and file-swapping seems a dead-end.
>
> Boycotts (like the one above) and other actions have a long and proud
> history in the broader labor movement, but few outside of communists
> actually claimed that they owned the factory itself. I've talked to the
> file-swapping kids in their twenties and they are kidding themselves when
> they say, "Well, 18 bucks a CD is too much." That may be, but the market
> is and may still adjust for that, according to recent reports. And what
> gives them the right to steal? I know, "everyone's doing it." From a
legal,
> let alone moral standpoint, consumers of these files ("rippers," "burners"
> etc) are only kidding themselves.
>
> Don't get me wrong, I think the industry probably had it coming, but let's
> not act surprised when the long arm of the law says "wait a minute." I
look
> forward either Cookie responding on this issue (I know it's close to home)
> or anyone else who can engage without their heart on their sleeve. It's a
> fascinating issue and I don't know what will happen to the companies and
> artists we love.
>
> -Chris Burger



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